Tag Archives: iot

Announcing the Open IoT Challenge 3.0 scholars

The third edition of the Open IoT Challenge officially started one week ago. More than 80 teams have submitted their entries and are now in the running to win the Open IoT Challenge 3.0!

Participants have about three months to complete their solution and show the world how open source and open standards can help build innovative IoT solutions. On February 27, they will have to submit their final project report and hope that their work ends up in the top 3 winning solutions.

For now, the judges have reviewed all submissions and we have awarded  a “starter kit” to the most promising solutions. We hope this will help them bootstrap their project. The kit comes in the form of $150 gift card to buy IoT hardware, as well as access to special offers from our sponsors.

The lucky teams/participants are (in no particular order):

  • Tom Morocz – Residential home diagnostics
  • Bilal Al-Saeedi – Water management for farms
  • Benjamin Lassillour – Fish farming management
  • Siva Prasad Katru – Agriculture app to manage a farm
  • Sergey Vasiliev – Environmental monitoring
  • Mark Lidd – build a secured device that can scan and detect IoT objects that could be compromised
  • Nedko Nedkov – Domestic intrusion detection system
  • Amarendra Sahoo – Retail food storage management
  • Deepak Sharma – Smart traffic lights and controller
  • Celso Mangueira – Breeding monitor
  • Vinayan H – MPulse: machine health monitor
  • Tien Cao-hoang – Sensor network to monitor fish farms
  • Anupam Datta – Factory equipment maintenance
  • Ettore Verrecchia – Intelligent monitored garbage collection system
  • Juan Pizarro – Greenhouse automation/smart farming platform
  • Marcos OAP – Low cost connected homes smart city system
  • Didier Donsez / i-greenhouse: monitor greenhouses for organic and auto-production agriculture with LoRa and Sigfox endpoints

As you see, all the submissions have very specific use cases in mind, and I’m really looking forward to seeing the solutions that will be built.

If you entered the challenge and your name does not come up in this list, it doesn’t mean you’re out – not at all! There were only so many entries we could select (and you may have noticed we selected more than initially planned), and unfortunately we had to draw a line somewhere. If you haven’t been awarded the “starter kit”, we still very much hope you will work on the project you’ve submitted.

All the participants will be sharing their journey on their blogs and on social media, so stay tuned to see what they will be up to! I will also be relaying some of the cool stuff being built on Twitter as well, of course.

Open IoT Challenge: some very cool projects being developed!

Over the course of the last couple weeks, the participants who entered the Open IoT Challenge have started working on their projects. They are all documenting their journey on our dedicated Tumblr, and to be honest I’m very excited to see what they are doing: keep on reading for a quick update on some of the work done by the challengers so far.

Also, if you are reading this post and are a challenger of the Open IoT Challenge, I hope this will be encouraging you to start being more vocal about what you are doing! So once again, to all the participants: good luck and keep up the good work! 🙂

Logging and Monitoring of industrial equipment using Modbus and Kura

Tobiasz Dworak is working on a nice project that will be solving a typical problem in the industry: bridging legacy sensor networks to the Internet of Things. Typically, industrial automation equipment can be controlled using Modbus, so Tobiasz is proposing to implement an app on top of the Kura application framework to allow Modbus devices to be controlled from the Internet of Things, using MQTT and LwM2M. There should also be a local LCD display allowing to interact with the system.

iotchal1

Vehicle Monitoring System

Screen Shot 2015-02-05 at 21.47.38 If you are interested in learning more about Kura, you should really follow Davide’s project. Davide is building a cloud vehicle monitoring system by leveraging the Kura capabilities to interface with GPS devices and CANbus, and will use the Solair Application Platform for cloud data management.

Davide has been doing a great job of documenting his progress so far and you can really learn a lot on Kura and OSGi development by following his blog.

watr.li – Building the Internet of Plants!

RIOTRIOT OS is a pretty cool operating system for the Internet of Things that targets tiny computers and MCUs. Watr.li is a great project by a group of people involved with the development of RIOT, who want to build the Internet of Plants.

They are building on top of 6LoWPAN and CoAP and will be creating sensor nodes (measuring the humidity of the plant) as well as a display node (a Raspberry Pi, that will bridge the 6LoWPAN network to the Internet and expose a web interface).

IoNeeds

ioneeds_architecture_v1

This one is just getting started but Emir and Utku have the ambitious goal of building an automated system for monitoring the jars and containers that we all use for our food, spices, etc. IoNeeds storage boxes and jars have light, temperature and humidity sensors and ultrasonic sensor for measuring fullness, and they will be connected to the Internet of Things to let you optimize your budget by giving you statistics on your consumption, or automatically order new products to refill the jar.

The Open IoT Challenge has officially started!

The Open IoT Challenge has received an incredible amount of interest so far, and it is 45 projects in total who entered the challenge! They now have about a month to work on their solution and demonstrate why they deserve to win.

We expect all the challengers to document the evolution of their projects and it will be interesting to see the variety of technologies and open-source projects being used.
You can follow what is happening thanks to the Tumblr that we created for the occasion: http://openiotchallenge.tumblr.com.

open iot challenge tumblr

Finally, last week, we have selected 10 projects that have been awarded with a $150 gift card to help buy hardware parts for their solution. Here are the names of the lucky winners:

  • Davide De Cesaris
  • Ravi Butani
  • Franz Schnyder
  • Lotte Steenbrink
  • Tobiasz Dworak
  • Abhishek
  • Emir Ercan Ayar
  • Sergey Vasiliev
  • Markus Fischer
  • Arne Jenssen

Open IoT Challenge deadline is approaching – prize pool over $20K!

A quick reminder to everyone that we are accepting applications for the Open IoT Challenge until next week, January 17.

There are many exciting projects being proposed by developers all around the world, from wireless home automation solutions to geolocation solutions for quadcopters, and many more, so don’t wait and enter now! If you feel like you don’t have all the skills to build something by yourself, remember that we accept applications from teams, so talk to your friends and let your ambitious or crazy ideas become a reality!

Thanks to our sponsors Eurotech and IS2T, the prize pool for the challenge amounts to over $20,000, which I think will make the competition even more fierce and exciting!

I am happy to discuss any ideas you may have to help you put together amazing applications that I’m sure will turn into amazing projects, so feel very free to contact me.

Open IoT Challenge FAQ

The feedback following the announcement of the Open IoT challenge has been fantastic! The good news is that we’ve already improved the prize pool, and we are also happy to announce that the best applications will be eligible to get $150 worth of hardware parts required to build the final project. Thanks to our sponsor Eurotech for making this possible!

Several people have contacted me with questions so here is a little FAQ to clarify some of the conditions to participate.

Can I use a commercial product as part of my project?

Yes, of course! With this challenge we want to help demonstrate that there are really cool commercial IoT products out there that can really benefit from the ecosystem of open-source libraries and frameworks. If you know of a great commercial MQTT broker and want to use it to send your sensor data, that’s fine! If you want to hack a Nest thermostat to hook it to an open-source data analytics frameworks, that’s fine too!

Are there any publicly available IoT data sources that I could use?

There are many data sources that you may want to try and use as part of your project. The Google keyword here would of course be “open data“. Many cities are starting to make available the current position of their buses, the pollution levels, etc. You can for example have a look at the air quality of the city of London thanks to the London Air API. There are also many “offline” data sources (OpenStreetMap, geotagged Flickr pictures, etc.) that you may want to feed in your system to provide better data visualization, or to correlate environmental data with data coming from your sensors.

When is the deadline to participate?

You have until January, 17th to apply by filling the dedicated online form. If you are short-listed, your final project will have to be completed by February 27, 2015.

If you have more questions, please feel free to comment on this blog post or drop me an email using the contact form.

Announcing the Open IoT challenge

2014 is almost over, and one of the first big events for Eclipse IoT next year will be EclipseCon 2015, March 9-12 in Burlingame, California.
If you haven’t seen the EclipseCon program already, I highly encourage you to check out all the great sessions that we have selected as part of the IoT Theme Day, and of course the rest of the program which has just been announced. This year, EclipseCon is colocated with FOSS4G North America, the largest global gathering focused on open source geospatial software.

In order to encourage everyone to start making Internet of Things a reality, we are launching a programming contest that fosters the creation of IoT projects based on top of open-source technologies, and that we hope will keep everyone busy during the few months separating us from EclipseCon. You can get familiar with the conditions to participate at http://iot.eclipse.org/open-iot-challenge.

Here are a few ideas of projects or technologies that I would really like to see used by the participants:

  • Geolocation technologies like the ones available as part of the LocationTech initiative. How about, for example, using GeoMesa to store spatio-temporal data points corresponding to the air quality measured by environmental sensors?
  • A project combining low-cost/low-power IoT microcontrollers powered by an embedded OS like Contiki or RIOT, and a more powerful IoT gateway (running for example Kura) in charge of the heavy lifting of the sensor data before it’s sent to the cloud.
  • IoT is merely a buzzword (sorry, I hope you already knew! :smile:) for “connecting more devices to the internet”. Those devices’ core value is their data, and there are many opportunities for your projects to leverage time-series databases or stream processing technologies to actually make sense out of the amount of data generated by the IoT.

To enter the challenge, you simply have to apply via this online form before January 17, 2015 and tell us what you plan to build. Don’t wait!

Espruino Pico on Kickstarter: only 4 days to go!

If you follow our regular IoT hangouts, you probably have seen this presentation of the Espruino Pico already:

If you don’t, you really want to check out espruino.com!

Espruino is an Open Source and Open Hardware project that provides a super-tiny implementation of Javascript that runs on micro-controllers. The Espruino board is a ready-to-use board that you can use to run Javascript IoT applications, but the Espruino interpreter can also run on lots of other targets.

Gordon Williams, the lead of Espruino, is working on a new version of the Espruino board with a tiny form factor, and his Kickstarter ends in only 4 days.
While the initial goal has already been reached, I would really like to see him reach the £50,000 stretch goal since it means he will implement socket support in the Espruino interpreter, allowing IoT developers to use MQTT, CoAP, and the like right from their Javascript code!

Please consider supporting this very cool open source project and don’t wait any longer to go visit their Kickstarter page!