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Eclipse IoT

Last Days to Participate to Our Annual IoT Developer Survey

For the past three years, we have been partnering with a number of organizations – IEEE, Open Mobile Alliance and Agile-IoT – to get a sense of the general trends in the IoT industry through an online survey.

The fourth edition of this survey ends on March 5th, and I am hoping that many of you who haven’t already will be participating – it litteraly takes just 5 minutes to answer. Whether you are actually a developer, or simply involved in building IoT solutions one way or the other, your input will be key to understanding what kind of IoT solutions people are building today, and more importantly how they are doing it.

Like in previous years, we will be making publicly available both the consolidated and raw results of the survey, which should be one more reason to help us get as many respondents as possible so that the results can be even more valuable to your own organization, and to the community at large! 🙂

The results from last year, for example, provided interesting feedback on the rising interest in Industrial IoT, who people see as IoT corporate leaders, or what are the programming languages and frameworks typically used by developers.

Please don’t wait and take the survey now!

Categories
Eclipse IoT

Announcing the Open IoT Challenge 3.0 scholars

The third edition of the Open IoT Challenge officially started one week ago. More than 80 teams have submitted their entries and are now in the running to win the Open IoT Challenge 3.0!

Participants have about three months to complete their solution and show the world how open source and open standards can help build innovative IoT solutions. On February 27, they will have to submit their final project report and hope that their work ends up in the top 3 winning solutions.

For now, the judges have reviewed all submissions and we have awarded  a “starter kit” to the most promising solutions. We hope this will help them bootstrap their project. The kit comes in the form of $150 gift card to buy IoT hardware, as well as access to special offers from our sponsors.

The lucky teams/participants are (in no particular order):

  • Tom Morocz – Residential home diagnostics
  • Bilal Al-Saeedi – Water management for farms
  • Benjamin Lassillour – Fish farming management
  • Siva Prasad Katru – Agriculture app to manage a farm
  • Sergey Vasiliev – Environmental monitoring
  • Mark Lidd – build a secured device that can scan and detect IoT objects that could be compromised
  • Nedko Nedkov – Domestic intrusion detection system
  • Amarendra Sahoo – Retail food storage management
  • Deepak Sharma – Smart traffic lights and controller
  • Celso Mangueira – Breeding monitor
  • Vinayan H – MPulse: machine health monitor
  • Tien Cao-hoang – Sensor network to monitor fish farms
  • Anupam Datta – Factory equipment maintenance
  • Ettore Verrecchia – Intelligent monitored garbage collection system
  • Juan Pizarro – Greenhouse automation/smart farming platform
  • Marcos OAP – Low cost connected homes smart city system
  • Didier Donsez / i-greenhouse: monitor greenhouses for organic and auto-production agriculture with LoRa and Sigfox endpoints

As you see, all the submissions have very specific use cases in mind, and I’m really looking forward to seeing the solutions that will be built.

If you entered the challenge and your name does not come up in this list, it doesn’t mean you’re out – not at all! There were only so many entries we could select (and you may have noticed we selected more than initially planned), and unfortunately we had to draw a line somewhere. If you haven’t been awarded the “starter kit”, we still very much hope you will work on the project you’ve submitted.

All the participants will be sharing their journey on their blogs and on social media, so stay tuned to see what they will be up to! I will also be relaying some of the cool stuff being built on Twitter as well, of course.

Categories
Eclipse IoT

Open IoT Challenge: some very cool projects being developed!

Over the course of the last couple weeks, the participants who entered the Open IoT Challenge have started working on their projects. They are all documenting their journey on our dedicated Tumblr, and to be honest I’m very excited to see what they are doing: keep on reading for a quick update on some of the work done by the challengers so far.

Also, if you are reading this post and are a challenger of the Open IoT Challenge, I hope this will be encouraging you to start being more vocal about what you are doing! So once again, to all the participants: good luck and keep up the good work! 🙂

Logging and Monitoring of industrial equipment using Modbus and Kura

Tobiasz Dworak is working on a nice project that will be solving a typical problem in the industry: bridging legacy sensor networks to the Internet of Things. Typically, industrial automation equipment can be controlled using Modbus, so Tobiasz is proposing to implement an app on top of the Kura application framework to allow Modbus devices to be controlled from the Internet of Things, using MQTT and LwM2M. There should also be a local LCD display allowing to interact with the system.

iotchal1

Vehicle Monitoring System

Screen Shot 2015-02-05 at 21.47.38 If you are interested in learning more about Kura, you should really follow Davide’s project. Davide is building a cloud vehicle monitoring system by leveraging the Kura capabilities to interface with GPS devices and CANbus, and will use the Solair Application Platform for cloud data management.

Davide has been doing a great job of documenting his progress so far and you can really learn a lot on Kura and OSGi development by following his blog.

watr.li – Building the Internet of Plants!

RIOTRIOT OS is a pretty cool operating system for the Internet of Things that targets tiny computers and MCUs. Watr.li is a great project by a group of people involved with the development of RIOT, who want to build the Internet of Plants.

They are building on top of 6LoWPAN and CoAP and will be creating sensor nodes (measuring the humidity of the plant) as well as a display node (a Raspberry Pi, that will bridge the 6LoWPAN network to the Internet and expose a web interface).

IoNeeds

ioneeds_architecture_v1

This one is just getting started but Emir and Utku have the ambitious goal of building an automated system for monitoring the jars and containers that we all use for our food, spices, etc. IoNeeds storage boxes and jars have light, temperature and humidity sensors and ultrasonic sensor for measuring fullness, and they will be connected to the Internet of Things to let you optimize your budget by giving you statistics on your consumption, or automatically order new products to refill the jar.