Tag Archives: kura

Eclipse Kura on Steroids with UPM and Eclipse OpenJ9

So it’s been a while since the last time I blogged about a cool IoT demo… Sorry about that! On the bright side, this post covers a couple projects that are really, really, neat so hopefully, this will help you forgive me for the wait! 🙃

UP Squared Grove IoT Development Kit

At the end of last year, a new high-performance IoT developer kit was announced. Built on top of the UP Squared board, it features an Intel Apollo lake x86-64 processor, plenty of GPIOs, two Ethernet interfaces, USB 3.0 ports, an Altera MAX 10 FPGA, and more. You can get the kit from Seeed Studio for USD 249.

The UP Squared Grove IoT Development Kit

Of course, it wouldn’t be a Grove kit without the Grove shield that can be attached on top of the board to simplify the connection to a wide variety of sensors and actuators (and there’s actually a few of them in the kit).

Running Eclipse Kura on the UP Squared board

Enough with the hardware! With all this horsepower, it is of course very tempting to run Eclipse Kura on this. The UP Squared being based on an Intel x86-64 processor, it is incredibly easy to start by replacing the default OpenJDK JVM by Eclipse OpenJ9. Here’s your two-step tutorial to get Eclipse OpenJ9 and Eclipse Kura running on your board:

In case you are wondering how much faster OpenJ9 is compared to OpenJDK or Oracle’s JVMs, here’s a quick comparison of the startup time of Eclipse Kura on the UP Squared:

Eclipse Kura start-up time on Intel UP Squared Grove kit

UPM

UPM logo

UPM is a set of libraries for interacting with sensors and actuators in a cross-platform, cross-OS, language-agnostic, way.

There are over 400 sensors & actuators supported in UPM. Virtually all the “DIY” sensors you can get from SeeedStudio, Adafruit, etc. are supported, but beyond that, UPM also provides support for a wide variety of industrial sensors.

Thanks to Eclipse Kura Wires and the underlying concept of “Drivers” and “Assets”, Kura provides a way to access physical assets in a generic way.

In the next section, we will see a proof-of-concept of UPM libraries being wrapped as Kura “drivers” in order to make it really simple to interact with the 400+ kind of sensors/actuators supported by UPM.

Integrating UPM in Kura Wires

UPM drivers are small native C/C++ libraries that expose bindings in several programming languages, including Java, and therefore calling UPM drivers from Kura is pretty simple.

The only thing you need is a few JARs for UPM itself (and for MRAA, the framework that is supporting it), the JARs for the driver(s) of the particular sensor(s) you want to use, and the associated native libraries (.so files) for the above. As you may know, OSGi makes it pretty easy to package native libraries that may go alongside Java/JNI libraries, so there is really no difficulty there.

In order for the UPM drivers to be accessible from Kura Wires, and to expose “channels” corresponding to the methods available on them, they need to be bundled as Kura Drivers. This is also a pretty straightforward task, and while I created the driver for only a few sensor types out of the 400+ supported in UPM, I am pretty confident that Kura drivers can be automatically generated from UPM drivers.

You can find the final result on my Github: https://github.com/kartben/org.intellabs.upm.

See it in action!

So what do we end up getting, and why should you care? Just check out the video below and see for yourself!

Tutorial: Connecting Eclipse Kura to AWS IoT

Just a few weeks ago, Amazon Web Services (AWS) announced that they added the ability for their customers to manage IoT solutions. More specifically, they are offering a managed IoT platform that allows to connect your devices using HTTP or MQTT, and that integrates with other AWS services to simplify things like message processing, persistence in S3 or DynamoDB, … you name it! And of course, this is meant to scale to billions of devices, although I have to admit I have not tested that just yet 🙂

In this article, I will show you how you can connect your Eclipse Kura gateway to AWS IoT. Since the authorization and overall security mechanisms in AWS IoT heavily rely on certificates, the only tricky bit will be for us to properly configure the Kura gateway so as it establishes a trusted connection to the AWS backend.

Continue reading Tutorial: Connecting Eclipse Kura to AWS IoT

3 hardware platforms of choice to get started with Eclipse IoT

When you prototype IoT solutions, it becomes necessary very early in your development phase to use an actual embedded platform to run your software, and to test it in an environment that is as close as possible of what you expect your production environment to be.

As I’m sure you know, there are lots of hardware prototyping platforms out there. In this article you will learn about three very popular options (from the cheapest/tiniest to the most capable) that can help you get started with Eclipse IoT projects in no time, and get pointers to useful docs and tutorials to make the initial setup as simple as possible!

Continue reading 3 hardware platforms of choice to get started with Eclipse IoT