Tag Archives: challenge

Announcing the Open IoT Challenge 3.0 scholars

The third edition of the Open IoT Challenge officially started one week ago. More than 80 teams have submitted their entries and are now in the running to win the Open IoT Challenge 3.0!

Participants have about three months to complete their solution and show the world how open source and open standards can help build innovative IoT solutions. On February 27, they will have to submit their final project report and hope that their work ends up in the top 3 winning solutions.

For now, the judges have reviewed all submissions and we have awarded  a “starter kit” to the most promising solutions. We hope this will help them bootstrap their project. The kit comes in the form of $150 gift card to buy IoT hardware, as well as access to special offers from our sponsors.

The lucky teams/participants are (in no particular order):

  • Tom Morocz – Residential home diagnostics
  • Bilal Al-Saeedi – Water management for farms
  • Benjamin Lassillour – Fish farming management
  • Siva Prasad Katru – Agriculture app to manage a farm
  • Sergey Vasiliev – Environmental monitoring
  • Mark Lidd – build a secured device that can scan and detect IoT objects that could be compromised
  • Nedko Nedkov – Domestic intrusion detection system
  • Amarendra Sahoo – Retail food storage management
  • Deepak Sharma – Smart traffic lights and controller
  • Celso Mangueira – Breeding monitor
  • Vinayan H – MPulse: machine health monitor
  • Tien Cao-hoang – Sensor network to monitor fish farms
  • Anupam Datta – Factory equipment maintenance
  • Ettore Verrecchia – Intelligent monitored garbage collection system
  • Juan Pizarro – Greenhouse automation/smart farming platform
  • Marcos OAP – Low cost connected homes smart city system
  • Didier Donsez / i-greenhouse: monitor greenhouses for organic and auto-production agriculture with LoRa and Sigfox endpoints

As you see, all the submissions have very specific use cases in mind, and I’m really looking forward to seeing the solutions that will be built.

If you entered the challenge and your name does not come up in this list, it doesn’t mean you’re out – not at all! There were only so many entries we could select (and you may have noticed we selected more than initially planned), and unfortunately we had to draw a line somewhere. If you haven’t been awarded the “starter kit”, we still very much hope you will work on the project you’ve submitted.

All the participants will be sharing their journey on their blogs and on social media, so stay tuned to see what they will be up to! I will also be relaying some of the cool stuff being built on Twitter as well, of course.

Announcing the 16 winners of the Open IoT Challenge starter kit!

It’s now been a bit more than 2 weeks since the second edition of the Open IoT Challenge has officially started. More than 80 teams have applied to be part of the challenge, and if you ask me, that’s really exciting!

They will be working until end of February next year to complete their project, and to demonstrate how open source and open standards can help build innovative IoT solutions faster.

We have awarded the 16 most promising proposals a starter kit that we hope will help them bootstrap their project. The kits  a $150 gift card to buy IoT hardware, as well as access to special offers from our sponsors.

sponsors iot challenge

The lucky teams/participants are:

  • Sarthak Sethi – Farm monitoring
  • Davide De Cesaris & Marcello Majonchi – IoT into space
  • Shivankur Pilania – Artificial Intelligence based circadian clock
  • Deepak Sharma & team – Smart kitchen container
  • András Vörös & team – Improving cyber-physical systems with IoT technologies
  • Iranga Supun Athukorale & team – Elderly care using advanced thermal footprint tracking
  • Tien Cao-hoang – Water level monitoring for paddy fields
  • Franz Schnyder – “IoT-ing” a mountain’s hut off-grid solar power system
  • Ettore Verrecchia – Remotely controlled intelligent street lamp
  • Mahavir Dwivedi & team – Remote monitoring of patient’s vital parameters for rural areas
  • Manolis Nikiforakis & team – Device management for the ESP8266 using LWM2M, Leshan, Wakaama and Kura
  • Aprian Diaz Novandi & team – Forest fire detection
  • Rajesh Sola & team – Adding MQTT-SN support to Eclipse Kura
  • MirMohamed Salman & team – Finding petroleum/service station based on vehicle breakdown indication
  • Tobiasz Dworak – Medical IoT gateway based on Eclipse Kura
  • Steve Liang  & team– Connected babies

All the participants will be sharing their experience on our dedicated Tumblr, so you probably want to follow it if you’re interesting in following their stories!

What will you build for the Open IoT Challenge 2.0?

I am really excited that we are having a second edition of the Open IoT Challenge. Last year, more than 60 teams entered and we ended up with some seriously cool projects being built!

So we are back, with more prizes, more sponsors, and more importantly even more cool ideas of what you could build if you decide to participate. You will find below some project ideas that you may want to explore, but I am pretty sure many of you will just surprise the jury by coming up with even cooler ideas! :-)

Hardware integration

I would really like to see integrations of your projects with new kinds of sensors. Measuring temperature and humidity is so mainstream now, is it not? :) How about solutions for health monitoring, using blood pressure monitors, or even EKG?

Last year we’ve seen integrations with cars, over OBD-II, and I’m sure there is still a lot to do in that area (how about a solution to help people drive more efficiently by allowing them to compare their gas consumption with others on a given road?).

Another interesting idea would be to explore how to improve the User Experience (UX) for IoT, by providing new ways to interact with IoT devices: gesture interactions, sound control (look at e.g. Amazon Alexa), etc.

Wireless technologies

  • LoRa? Sigfox, anyone? Those wireless technologies definitely get lots of traction these days and I am looking forward to seeing projects that will highlight how they can be combined with existing open source technologies. It would for example be interesting to see teams adding LoRaWAN support in Eclipse Kura.
  • Bluetooth Smart/BLE is becoming more and more mainstream, and lots of IoT starter kits now include BLE (TI’s SensorTag obviously comes to mind). Not only will BLE provide wireless sensing capabilities to your project, but you can certainly get more creative and start building solutions that use beacons to do indoor positioning…

Data Analytics

What if you could predict when an event is going to occur by analyzing your IoT data stream?

I am hoping that some of you will be using technology like Apache Spark and process IoT Data to extract patterns that can be used to predict when e.g the battery of a device is going to depleted. You probably want to look at things like at the Apache Spark Streaming API, the MLlib machine learning engine, and this code example for doing Apache Spark Streaming with MQTT.

Enter now!

You have 10 days left to submit your application, so don’t wait any longer and let us know what you will be building.  If your proposal is particularly cool, you will be awarded a $150 gift card that you will be able to use to buy the hardware parts needed for building your project.
You can find more details on the challenge on the dedicated web page.

Thanks to our sponsors bitreactive, Eurotech, IS2T, Red Hat and Zolertia for supporting the challenge by providing prizes for the winners, as well as access to special offers for all the challengers.

sponsors iot challenge

Announcing the Open IoT Challenge winners

Oh boy, this has been a difficult call, but we are happy to finally be able to announce the three winners of our Open IoT Challenge!
The challenge has been keeping our participants busy for two months, and I’ve already blogged about the ten awesome projects that actually completed their projects.

Our jury (Andrea Ceiner from Eurotech, Fred Rivard from IS2T, Ian Skerrett and myself) has selected the following winners:

Grand Winner: Davide de Cesaris, for the Carracho project

1-caracho

Davide has been blogging like crazy about his Carracho project, and it’s really no surprise: he really implemented lots of interesting features in his cloud-based vehicle monitoring solution, so he had a lot to share!

Here are some of the features implemented in Carracho:

  • Read vehicle ECU parameters via Bluetooth exploiting the OBD-II standard protocol
  • Capture GPS data with a USB dongle and parse them
  • Scan for nearby Bluetooth devices to check enabled drivers
  • Detect security issues like flames or gas leaks

Davide’s project is very complete, and a great demonstration of how Kura can help Java developers to quickly build IoT applications. On the server side, Carracho is leveraging the Solair Cloud Platform. It looks like Davide has lots of ideas for the future of Carracho, so I hope he will continue blogging about his experiences :smile:

Davide wins $750, a full MicroEJ license ($5500) and 3 Cortex-M4 development boards! Congratulations!

Runner-up: Emir Ercan Ayar and team, for the IoNeeds project

2-ioneeds-2

IoNeeds allows to turn your jar (yes, that antique device used to store rice, flour, and what not) into a connected object able to automatically let you know when it is empty, and possibly place online orders for you. You should really have a look at what they did – they even documented how to create your own PCB for the jar monitoring device!

This is a very complete project and I think I will probably try to replicate it myself :smile:. I do hope Emir and Utku will take the idea further, and maybe do a Kickstarter some day!

Emir and his team win $500, a full MicroEJ license and 2 Cortex-M4 development boards.

Third place: Lotte Steenbrink and team for the watr.li project

It’s hard to describe watr.li in a better way than the awesome demo that Lotte and her team in their wrap-up video below. Long story short: watr.li is very cool, and you should really have a look at RIOT if you are interested in wireless sensor networks!

The code for the project is on Github.

Lotte and her team win $250, a full MicroEJ license and 1 Cortex-M4 development boards.


Finally, we would like to acknowledge the quality of all the projects that entered the challenge. The jury wanted to give a special mention to Franz Schnyder’s home automation project. Franz integrated MQTT-SN in Kura, and I really encourage you to have a look at his project, and the source code that he’s made available.

eurotech-and-is2t

Thanks to all the participants for their hard work, and thanks to our sponsors Eurotech and IS2T for the fantastic prize pool. I really hope we will have other challenges like this in the future: developers really are the people who will make IoT a reality!

Open IoT Challenge – Final submissions

The Open IoT challenge ended earlier this week, and it was pretty exciting to see the final submissions coming in the form of blog posts and video during the last hours before the deadline.

Below are the 10 projects who validated their participation to the challenge, together with the links to learn more about what they have built during the 2 months the challenge lasted. Exciting stuff!

Carracho

The project aims to build an advanced monitoring car system, integrating the huge amount of sensors data from the car ECU (read by standard OBD-II interface) with smartphone sensors data (like GPS). A gateway (a Raspberry Pi with Kura OSGi framework) can collect the data, wrap them in a MQTT packet and finally send them to a remote MQTT server exploiting the 3G connection provided by the smartphone (the latter could be connected to the Raspberry Pi with bluetooth interface).

→ Read more: http://diyapps.blogspot.com/2015/03/eclipse-open-iot-challenge-final-post.html

IoNeeds

IoNeeds basically measures fullness, light, temperature and humidity of storage boxes and jars continuously. It stores the data on cloud and when it encounters with extreme values, it applies the rules which previously configured on control panel such as sending SMS, Android/iOS notifications. Also it can be configured with e-commerce web sites’ order APIs. So it enables auto-order scenarios like “Automatically order the product from web if fullness value is under 50%”

→ Read more : http://ioneeds.com/2015/03/final-ioneeds-is-working-now/

DIY Home Automation

A DIY “home automation” solution based on MQTT-SN, Node-RED, Arduino, Raspberry Pi and nRF24L01+ RF transceivers.

→ Read more: http://openiotchallenge.tumblr.com/post/114361695760/project-wrap-up

Raspberry Pi R/C car

Program a remote controlled Raspberry Pi Robot car using Reactive Blocks.

→ Read more: http://www.bitreactive.com/remote-controlled-raspberry-pi-car-part-3-2/

watr.li, Internet of Plants

Keeping plants alive in an office without regular hours is hard: Either everybody thinks their colleagues have already watered the plants or multiple people water the same plant, resulting in either drought or overhydration.

→ Read more: http://watr.li/wrapup.html

Hot Desking Dilemma

More and more companies offer their employees the possibility to work remote from home instead of working in the office. Hot desking – multiple employees share one desk over a week – is a common practice for such companies in order to reduce costs. People who know this setting also know the downsides of this model: it is just pretty hard to get a desk when you need one.

→ Read more: http://icanseedeadcats.com/2015/03/24/eclipse-iot-challenge-mqtt-communication-for-hot-desks-featuring-kura-mosquitto-and-paho-and-project-wrapup

LwM2M over MQTT

The current stack for LWM2M relies on CoAP as the protocol. Along with CoAP, MQTT is another standard which is being very widely used in M2M scenarios. Our solution involves development of an LWM2M server prototype, as well as, a client prototype, which make use of MQTT as the underlying M2M protocol. Thus LWM2M can be used for both CoAP, as well as, MQTT.

→ Read more: http://openiotchallenge.tumblr.com/post/112230693320/lwm2m-over-mqtt

Monitoring industrial automation

This project realizes a device that monitors a set of defined parameters (mapped to MODBUS registers on a device) and based on defined rule take action (store in internal memory, show as value or graph on local LCD or send using MQTT protocol to defined server). User is able to freely define mapping to MODBUS registers, poling interval, monitoring rules and actions).

→ Read more: https://tobiddev.wordpress.com/2015/03/24/summary-of-open-iot-challenge-monitoring-industrial-automation-equipment/

Smart Helmet

According to a survey, in India, 139,091 persons were killed in road accidents during the year 2012, out of which 23% constituted for Two-wheeler related incidents. The objective of the solution is to detect impact of the accident or fall occurred using the accelerometer mounted on the helmet.

→ Read more: http://byrebg.blogspot.in/2015/03/smart-helmet-using-eclipse-kura.html

Monitoring snow and ice falling down of roofs

In Norway it is the responsibility of building owners to warn people of risk of snow and ice falling down from the roofs of buildings. It is a serious liability. Some years ago in Oslo, a pedestrian got paralyzed after a iceblock fell from a building and hit his head.

→ Read more: http://openiotchallenge.tumblr.com/post/114484170515/warning-system-for-snow-ice-falling-from-roofs

Open IoT Challenge: some very cool projects being developed!

Over the course of the last couple weeks, the participants who entered the Open IoT Challenge have started working on their projects. They are all documenting their journey on our dedicated Tumblr, and to be honest I’m very excited to see what they are doing: keep on reading for a quick update on some of the work done by the challengers so far.

Also, if you are reading this post and are a challenger of the Open IoT Challenge, I hope this will be encouraging you to start being more vocal about what you are doing! So once again, to all the participants: good luck and keep up the good work! :)

Logging and Monitoring of industrial equipment using Modbus and Kura

Tobiasz Dworak is working on a nice project that will be solving a typical problem in the industry: bridging legacy sensor networks to the Internet of Things. Typically, industrial automation equipment can be controlled using Modbus, so Tobiasz is proposing to implement an app on top of the Kura application framework to allow Modbus devices to be controlled from the Internet of Things, using MQTT and LwM2M. There should also be a local LCD display allowing to interact with the system.

iotchal1

Vehicle Monitoring System

Screen Shot 2015-02-05 at 21.47.38 If you are interested in learning more about Kura, you should really follow Davide’s project. Davide is building a cloud vehicle monitoring system by leveraging the Kura capabilities to interface with GPS devices and CANbus, and will use the Solair Application Platform for cloud data management.

Davide has been doing a great job of documenting his progress so far and you can really learn a lot on Kura and OSGi development by following his blog.

watr.li – Building the Internet of Plants!

RIOTRIOT OS is a pretty cool operating system for the Internet of Things that targets tiny computers and MCUs. Watr.li is a great project by a group of people involved with the development of RIOT, who want to build the Internet of Plants.

They are building on top of 6LoWPAN and CoAP and will be creating sensor nodes (measuring the humidity of the plant) as well as a display node (a Raspberry Pi, that will bridge the 6LoWPAN network to the Internet and expose a web interface).

IoNeeds

ioneeds_architecture_v1

This one is just getting started but Emir and Utku have the ambitious goal of building an automated system for monitoring the jars and containers that we all use for our food, spices, etc. IoNeeds storage boxes and jars have light, temperature and humidity sensors and ultrasonic sensor for measuring fullness, and they will be connected to the Internet of Things to let you optimize your budget by giving you statistics on your consumption, or automatically order new products to refill the jar.

The Open IoT Challenge has officially started!

The Open IoT Challenge has received an incredible amount of interest so far, and it is 45 projects in total who entered the challenge! They now have about a month to work on their solution and demonstrate why they deserve to win.

We expect all the challengers to document the evolution of their projects and it will be interesting to see the variety of technologies and open-source projects being used.
You can follow what is happening thanks to the Tumblr that we created for the occasion: http://openiotchallenge.tumblr.com.

open iot challenge tumblr

Finally, last week, we have selected 10 projects that have been awarded with a $150 gift card to help buy hardware parts for their solution. Here are the names of the lucky winners:

  • Davide De Cesaris
  • Ravi Butani
  • Franz Schnyder
  • Lotte Steenbrink
  • Tobiasz Dworak
  • Abhishek
  • Emir Ercan Ayar
  • Sergey Vasiliev
  • Markus Fischer
  • Arne Jenssen