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Espruino Pico on Kickstarter: only 4 days to go!

If you follow our regular IoT hangouts, you probably have seen this presentation of the Espruino Pico already:

If you don’t, you really want to check out espruino.com!

Espruino is an Open Source and Open Hardware project that provides a super-tiny implementation of Javascript that runs on micro-controllers. The Espruino board is a ready-to-use board that you can use to run Javascript IoT applications, but the Espruino interpreter can also run on lots of other targets.

Gordon Williams, the lead of Espruino, is working on a new version of the Espruino board with a tiny form factor, and his Kickstarter ends in only 4 days.

While the initial goal has already been reached, I would really like to see him reach the £50,000 stretch goal since it means he will implement socket support in the Espruino interpreter, allowing IoT developers to use MQTT, CoAP, and the like right from their Javascript code!

Please consider supporting this very cool open source project and don’t wait any longer to go visit their Kickstarter page!

Eclipse IoT by the numbers

Three years ago, Sierra Wireless, IBM and Eurotech teamed up to create a Working Group that would help address Machine-to-Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) market fragmentation by promoting the use of open source implementations and open standards.

It’s incredible how much our community has grown since then, and I thought I would put together the infographic below to make it more visual. Feel free to share it, and visit the Eclipse IoT portal to learn more about the initiative.

Eclipse IoT by the numbers

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MQTT on the TI CC3200 LaunchPad thanks to Paho embedded client

What I really like with MQTT and CoAP is that they both are very simple protocols. When dealing with MQTT, the client itself has almost no state to maintain (at least when you stick to QoS 0 communications) and granted that you have an MQTT packet serializer/unserializer, it’s very simple to stuff such MQTT packets into TCP sockets using the networking APIs that your IoT microcontroller is providing.

I’ve had the opportunity to play with the TI CC3200 LaunchPad platform recently, and thought it would be a good candidate to try out the Paho embedded C Client.

The tutorial below, split into two parts (publishing and subscribing), gives a complete overview on how you can very easily port MQTT to the CC3200 and should probably be useful if you’re targeting another kind of platform, as it walks you through the process of tying in with the networking API of the underlying platform (TI SimpleLink™ in CC3200’s case)

Eclipse, open-source for the Internet of Things, and other random stuff